The Owl & The Hourglass

Handcrafted, Literature-Inspired Creations from the Donna Diddit Studio

Greetings!

You found our little hidey hole. Splendid!

 We are currently crafting, researching, designing, walking the hounds, napping (but only oh-so-briefly) and otherwise being cochlea-deep in getting our shop and wares ready for a new season. Check our events page for a full account of where and when we'll be in any one place selling our literature inspired items.

Should you enjoy catching up with us socially, pictures and some fun tidbits are added on no particular schedule to our Facebook Page.

If you purchased or received a Lots-O-Letters Word Game, all the details are here!

 In the meantime, here is one of our favorite places to wander around for inspiration....  

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NOTES FROM THE FIELD

While looking to balance out the research for my word games to incorporate women from antiquity to the modern age, I have been fortunate to come across some stunning digital resources. Today's find: Epistolae: Medieval Women's Letters from Columbia University.  The rabbit hole is deep, but there are many letter to read along the way. Most importantly, there are three letters from Eleanor of Aquitaine to the Pope which are exquisite (and potentially crafted by her secretary, but...)

Epistolae is a collection of letters to and from women dating from the 4th to the 13th century AD. These letters from the Middle Ages, written in Latin, are presented with English translations and are organized by the women participating. Biographical sketches of the women and descriptions of the subject matter or the historic context of the letter is included where available.

Dr. Joan Ferrante, Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature, of Columbia University has collected and translated these letters mainly from printed sources. Professor Ferrante worked with the Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning to develop this unique open online repository of the collection for teaching and research purposes.
— https://epistolae.ccnmtl.columbia.edu/